15.9.08

The Universal System of an Evolutionary Organism called Fate.

The Universal System of an Evolutionary Organism called Fate. 


I am about to argue that fate exists and the entire universe is an evolutionary organism and I am going to use James Frazer's book to prove it. 

"The Golden Bough" basically conjectures that all human thought evolved similarly in relation to its environment. Because every culture shares the same planet, which is subjected to the same rules of the universe, it would follow that everyone's interpretation of the world would be similar, or develop similarly. For example, people recognized that corn would grow at a certain time and the weather would change at a certain point in the year. By studying their own world and seeing that it was related to the larger system of astrology, people began to understand that the forces of the universe directly affected their lives, making them aware that they were completely dependent on these forces to survive (the moon controls water levels, position of earth to sun for harvesting weather). This in turn provoked the worshipping of those forces by human beings. They began to create stories-- what they believed to be real knowledge (synthetic a priori judgements)-- out of these initial beliefs for why certain forces acted certain ways, manifesting these forces in the gods they created for themselves: primarily Adonis, Attis, and Osiris. "The natural phenomena thus mythically conceived and mythically represented were the great changes of the seasons, especially the most striking and impressive of all, the decay and revival of vegetation; and the intention of the sacred dramas was to refresh and strengthen, by sympathetic magic, the failing energies of nature, in order that the trees should bear fruit, that the corn should ripen, that men and animals should reproduce their kinds." (390) Forces of nature were thus personified by the hierarchies of divinities and reproduced by the people of the earth in their own social systems. This is how we can come to understand the seemingly unending examples that Frazer provides for us demonstrating the universally similar social structures of various civilizations (killing the king, scapegoats...).

Here, man's understanding of the world developed directly out his experience of the world. The similar social structures around the globe provided the framework needed for culture to explode out of religion: first came magic; then came the realization of the inefficacy of magic; then came religion; and finally, all of the resulting traditions that are based on the initial presumption that gods are in control of human life- namely marriage, prostitution, sacrificing, festivals, executions, etc. Those traditions that prevailed throughout history would eventually spawn the different aspects of culture we can see at this moment.

The implications of this understanding are enormous. If what I have described here is indeed true, that the present culture we see before us is a direct result of what came before, then what we can see is that man is simply a part of the evolution of the universe and has no free will to do (or understand) anything but what he is meant to do (or understand), or perhaps, what he is capable of doing (or understanding). 

We can understand this concept in another way: that everything is a function of itself. In a conversation, what I say in one moment is directly related to what I have said 8 seconds before that moment. History is an an example of this theory- September 11 happened because the United States government trained Bin Laden. We trained Bin Laden because of the cold war. The cold war was a result of WW2 which was a result of WW1 which was a result of imperialism and so on and so forth until we get to the very first experience of the universe which caused all the reactions to it. Theoretically, if we analyzed one second after the Big Bang in such depth that we could know absolutely everything about it and where everything was going to go and what it would do, then we could effectively predict the future, simply because everything is connected and reacting to that one singular event. 

As time goes on in the universe, stars explode and new planets are born. These produce new forces that act to shape human consciousness and development simply by existing. In this way we can conjecture that if man's consciousness is based on the surrounding nature and its effect concerning his basic anxieties (acquiring more food, creating children), then his mental and social development (beliefs, tradition, technology) is inextricably linked to the evolution of the universe, which is predicated on that initial "happening." This means that all of our actions and thought processes are predetermined, in that they would be performed simply because there was no other option than to perform them. Man's consciousness evolves as the universe evolves, as synthetic a priori judgements are made, and knowledge increases. And because everything happens as it is proceeded by what needed to proceed it, everything is linked. This leads us to conclude that if everything is connected into one system, then we can chart that system, making predictions about what may happen in the future, much in the same way as a Mayan calendar might do.

Thus, we can understand that the universe is not simply an empty space for evolution, but rather the evolution of an organism in and of itself. The history of human consciousness is man's understanding of the universe, which evolves out of perceiving the order of that organism. In this way we can see that, though we cannot know the future for sure, we can certainly understand the past and so its course, better predicting what directions the present is leading us towards. "In the ages to come man may be able to predict, perhaps even control, the wayward courses of the winds and clouds, but hardly will his puny hands have strength to speed afresh our slackening planet in its orbit or rekindle the dying fire of the sun." (807) Man created his social system in direct relation to his own surrounding universe- the direct result of one initial event. In this way, we can understand how fate truly exists. 

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